Done

September 29, 2014 at 12:59PM

September 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


When you make a webcomic, to whom are you accountable?

Over the last decade there has been an implicit contract made between a webcomics author and their intended audience. "I update regularly, and in exchange you support me through encouragement, word-of-mouth advertising, and purchasing merchandise." Because this contract is implicit, however, the commitment between author and audience is a bit fuzzy. If the cartoonist feels that the project has run its course or that it's not reaching the intended goals, they can retire the project without much fuss. After all, everyone was getting it for free.

As more cartoonists use Patreon (http://patreon.com) or Tapastic's Support Program (http://goo.gl/bjXd6f) to subsidize their webcomic, the contract becomes a lot more explicit. Introducing support tiers and rewards creates an even more clear commitment to an audience. You're saying "This webcomic is now my part-time job, and (maybe) I hope to make it a full-time job."

But a traditional part-time job, even one you take on just to make some extra income, usually promises a well-defined amount of payment. With services like Patreon and Tapastic you're making the commitment to show up for the job, but there is no promise of any specific amount of pay.

So to whom are you committing? Are you committed to reaching a certain monetary goal first and foremost? Or are you committing to servicing an audience with the hope of reaching a goal? And if you fail to reach that goal, how do you navigate the friction of quitting when you've already made an explicit promise to that audience?

Join us for a special unscheduled episode of the +Comics Are Great! show with guest +Brandon Dayton. Brandon has been navigating these concerns with his new Green Monk webcomic (http://ift.tt/1rFe4hv), and together we'll explore how things change when you make your webcomics intentions a lot more clear to the public.

You can be part of the discussion by commenting on the G+ Hangout event page: http://ift.tt/1rFe558

#patreon   #crowdfunding   #comics   #webcomics  

Webcomics: To Whom are You Committing?

*When you make a webcomic, to whom are you accountable?*

Over the last decade there has been an implicit contract made between a webcomics author and their intended audience. “I update regularly, and in exchange you support me through encouragement, word-of-mouth advertising, and purchasing merchandise.” Because this contract is implicit, however, the commitment between author and audience is a bit fuzzy. If the cartoonist feels that the project has run its course or that it’s not reaching the intended goals, they can retire the project without much fuss. After all, everyone was getting it for free.

As more cartoonists use Patreon (http://patreon.com) or Tapastic’s Support Program (http://goo.gl/bjXd6f) to subsidize their webcomic, the contract becomes a lot more explicit. Introducing support tiers and rewards creates an even more clear commitment to an audience. You’re saying “This webcomic is now my part-time job, and (maybe) I hope to make it a full-time job.”

But a traditional part-time job, even one you take on just to make some extra income, usually promises a well-defined amount of payment. With services like Patreon and Tapastic you’re making the commitment to show up for the job, but there is no promise of any specific amount of pay.

So to whom are you committing? Are you committed to reaching a certain monetary goal first and foremost? Or are you committing to servicing an audience with the hope of reaching a goal? And if you fail to reach that goal, how do you navigate the friction of quitting when you’ve already made an explicit promise to that audience?

Join us for a special unscheduled episode of the @111237521512731594998 show with guest @101922731373162555484. Brandon has been navigating these concerns with his new _Green Monk_ webcomic (http://ift.tt/1rFe4hv), and together we’ll explore how things change when you make your webcomics intentions a lot more clear to the public.

You can be part of the discussion by commenting on the G+ Hangout event page: http://ift.tt/1rFe558

#patreon   #crowdfunding   #comics   #webcomics  

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KCR! 13 – Cartoons to Comics, with Rafael Rosado

September 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Kids' Comics Revolution!, News, Podcasts

Giants Beware! Mermin! Rafael Rosado, and more!

Kids' Comics Revolution! 13

Comics and animation may share a lot of DNA. After all, the artists are clarifying their worlds through use of shape, size, line, and color.

But unlike comics, animated cartoons have sound and motion! Surely switching from animation to comics puts an artist at a disadvantage, or does it?

We talk with Rafael Rosado, storyboard artist on shows such as Scooby Doo and Transformers: Prime, who shares his experience and observations on switching from working in animation to co-creating the popular graphic novel, Giants Beware!

Rafael shows us how to draw Claudette, the heroine of Giants Beware!

Links mentioned:

Books recommended in this episode:

This episode features songs by Superchunk, The Pixies, and Maury Law & Glenn Yarbrough. Theme music by Harry and the Potters.

Audio hosting and production provided by the Ann Arbor District Library.

Follow JerzyDave, and KCRpodcast on Twitter!


September 25, 2014 at 11:45PM

September 25, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


Takeout Hippo isn't having it.
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September 25, 2014 at 11:34PM

September 25, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


Super neat blend of animation and comics

I've perhaps been guilty of vociferousness in regard to the importance of static imagery in comics storytelling (though I still stand by my position on that), but every once in a while someone will come along and find just the right balance of animation and comics storytelling techniques to make something unique and compelling.

+Joamette Gil did that with clearQuartz.

I've shut off comments on this post–be sure to post your comments (and +1s) on the original post after you've read the comic!

#comics   #webcomics  


Joamette Gil
originally shared:

And now clearQuartz is readable here on G+, too! As always, the best version to read is the panel-by-panel click-through version here: http://ift.tt/1qADs2h 

clearQuartz

src="http://ift.tt/1qADs2j"
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style="float: left; border: 0;margin: 0 -1px -1px 0;" />

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height="126"
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height="126"
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(11 images)

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September 25, 2014 at 11:27AM

September 25, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


CPTN SRSLY cover process

I'm off to a school assembly to deliver the next installment of the CPTN SRSLY and the Super Master Sentinels comic series, so I thought I'd share this process GIF of one of the covers.

Penciled on the Galaxy Note 10.1 in LayerPaint HD (http://goo.gl/z3oJbu), inked in Manga Studio 4 EX, colored in Photoshop CS5, lettered in Adobe Illustrator CS5.

#comics   #comicbooks   #process   #illustration  

src="http://ift.tt/YdgxDM"alt="attached image" />



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(800×1115)

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September 24, 2014 at 11:40PM

September 24, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


Talking about managing tight deadlines on the LIA Cast!

We've talked before on the +Lean Into Art Cast about using freelance gigs as an opportunity to experiment and learn new styles or skills. Recently, +Rob Stenzinger took on a freelance job where he only allowed himself 4 hours to complete the project. As we've said before, limitations breed creativity, and Rob discovered some pretty interesting things about the creative process (and himself) in meeting his tight deadline while satisfying his client.

Join us for another live stream of the Lean Into Art Cast where we'll explore how one might use a 4-hour time limit structured into 4 stages of creation to unlock new creative skills.

You can participate during the discussion via the G+ hangout event page.

The 4-Hour Project Experiment – LIA Cast 112

*Talking about managing tight deadlines on the LIA Cast!*

We’ve talked before on the @102971222991170968461 Cast about using freelance gigs as an opportunity to experiment and learn new styles or skills. Recently, @104223824845814651184 took on a freelance job where he only allowed himself 4 hours to complete the project. As we’ve said before, limitations breed creativity, and Rob discovered some pretty interesting things about the creative process (and himself) in meeting his tight deadline while satisfying his client.

Join us for another live stream of the Lean Into Art Cast where we’ll explore how one might use a 4-hour time limit structured into 4 stages of creation to unlock new creative skills.

You can participate during the discussion via the G+ hangout event page.

via Google+, where you can comment on this.

September 24, 2014 at 09:25PM

September 24, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


Teenager! Superhero! Fairy Princess?!

http://ift.tt/1mUMmgv

+Gregg Schigiel's fantastic comic Pix is finally available for purchase. She battles giant Magic 8-Balls and talking bear-fighting monkeys, all while trying to have a personal life. It's crazy fun superhero storytelling at its best. I can't recommend it enough.

You can check out a preview and purchase the physical and digital editions here: http://ift.tt/1mUMmgv

#comics #comocbooks #superheroes #adventure #kidlit

src="http://ift.tt/1uqbePm"alt="attached image" />



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September 24, 2014 at 09:48AM

September 24, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog


Join us for a discussion on Banned Books Week with +David Carter, Librarian at the University of Michigan's Comics and Video Game Archive. Together we'll explore censorship in comics and ways we can better advocate for our medium.

You can participate in the discussion via comments in the G+ Hangout Event page.

Recorded live at the Ann Arbor District Library.

#bannedbooksweek   #comics   #graphicnovels   #comicbooks   #censorship  

Banned Books – CAG! 105

Join us for a discussion on Banned Books Week with @115048845918801233092, Librarian at the University of Michigan’s Comics and Video Game Archive. Together we’ll explore censorship in comics and ways we can better advocate for our medium.

You can participate in the discussion via comments in the G+ Hangout Event page.

Recorded live at the Ann Arbor District Library.

#bannedbooksweek   #comics   #graphicnovels   #comicbooks   #censorship  

via Google+, where you can comment on this.

CAG! 103 – Blending Cute and Eerie, with Eric Orchard

September 22, 2014 by  
Filed under CAG Podcast, News, Podcasts

Talking about walking the line between eerie and cute on CAG!

In this special unscheduled episode of the Comics Are Great! show I’ll be joined by Eric Orchard, cartoonist behind Maddy Kettle: The Adventure of the Thimblewitch, published by Top Shelf. Maddy Kettle is a plucky young girl who faces witches, vampire bats, and spider goblins, yet never loses hope or refuses help when asked. She is assisted by friendly ballon-riding bears, banjo-playing raccoons, and vampire bats. So is this a creepy story or a light-hearted adventure? Maybe it can be both, thanks to the special affordances that only comics can offer!

Join us for a discussion on how comics is the perfect medium to blend opposite elements together and produce something new.

Links mentioned in this episode:

Live streams every other Wednesday at Comicsaregreat.tv and on Google+!

Audio hosting provided by Ka-Blam Digital Printing.

Jerzy on Google+
Find us on Google+
Support the show and get a PDF comic!
Subscribe through iTunes

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CAG! 102 – You Got Your Cosplay in My Comic! with Rachel Ashley-Lovelace

September 21, 2014 by  
Filed under CAG Podcast, News, Podcasts

Talking about the role of fandom on CAG!

Whatever your stance on cosplay, one can’t deny that it’s an active arena in fan participation with media. Is it simply a distracting branch that interferes with the “pure” transactions between fans and creators? Or is it a means for fans to enrich their participation with the creations themselves? When fandoms form around a creation, how should a creator respond?

This time I’m joined by Rachel Ashley-Lovelace for a discussion on the culture of fandoms and cosplay and how they might coexist with the creative forces that inform them.

AADL Production Librarian Anne Drozd also drops by for another round of book recommendations!

Links mentioned in this episode (thanks to Eric Klooster for collecting the links!):

Comics and Book Recommendations:

Live streams every other Wednesday at Comicsaregreat.tv and on Google+!

Audio hosting provided by Ka-Blam Digital Printing.

This episode was recorded live at the Ann Arbor District Library.

Jerzy on Google+
Find us on Google+
Support the show and get a PDF comic!
Subscribe through iTunes

RSS

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