Done

October 24, 2014 at 11:23PM

October 24, 2014 by  
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The heroes are coming, and they are cute!

L to R: Pickles, Boulder, Baron Von Bear, and Fleet. The Boulder and Fleet webcomic launches this Monday at http://ift.tt/1lP3ug5!

#inktober #boulderandfleet #bears #birds #pigs #fantasy

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October 24, 2014 at 10:46AM

October 24, 2014 by  
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How does the relationship with your readers change when you make your webcomic explicitly a part-time job?

https://lean-into-art.squarespace.com/blog/2014/10/24/lia-cast-114-webcomics-to-whom-are-you-committing-with-brandon-dayton

When taking on a new job, there's an explicit contract. I agree to show up for X amount of hours and produce X amount of work, and you agree to pay me X amount of money for doing so.

But the contract in webcomics has been historically implicit. You may be clear about delivering a certain amount of content on a certain schedule, but the responsibility of the audience was less defined. They may be "eyeballs" for advertising, they may be your "street team," or they may be customers who buy products based on your webcomic. Or they may be all of the above!

The advent of monetization services like +Patreon and Tapastic's Support Program (http://goo.gl/bjXd6f), introduces us to a kind of middle ground where the creator is explicit about the job they are ready to perform and its monetary value, but the audience has a lot of choice in honoring that contract–even the choice of determining the value of the product or service.

I had a terrific conversation about navigating these tensions with +Brandon Dayton, who has been running his own Patreon campaign for his comic, Green Monk (http://ift.tt/1rFe4hv). Together we discuss how the structure of Patreon invites a creator to clarify the project's goals and how he's explored his commitments to his audience, himself, and his work.

Listen to the show here: https://lean-into-art.squarespace.com/blog/2014/10/24/lia-cast-114-webcomics-to-whom-are-you-committing-with-brandon-dayton

#crowdfunding   #comics   #webcomics   #publishing   #selfpublishing  

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October 23, 2014 at 12:20PM

October 23, 2014 by  
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"Graphic Novels," or "Comics"? It's complicated.

When comics become a species of novel — the graphic kind instead of the young adult or literary kind — it sends the message that what matters most are the words. And that couldn't be more wrong. It's a huge mistake to underemphasize the "graphic" part of graphic novels; in fact, favoring words over pictures is a good recipe for making bad comics.

+Dan Mishkin shares some good food for thought about how nomenclature, while seemingly the purview of the obsessive and nerdy, can send mixed signals to an audience.

#comics   #comicbooks   #graphicnovels   #jfk  

Graphic Novel Visualizes JFK's Assassination



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October 23, 2014 at 10:22AM

October 23, 2014 by  
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Regina McRex slaps down the bad guys!

Regina McRex is a very polite and kind lady. But if she catches you doing evil–look out!

#inktober #boulderandfleet

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October 22, 2014 at 12:36PM

October 22, 2014 by  
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When you make a webcomic, to whom are you accountable?

Over the last decade there has been an implicit contract made between a webcomics author and their intended audience. "I update regularly, and in exchange you support me through encouragement, word-of-mouth advertising, and purchasing merchandise." Because this contract is implicit, however, the commitment between author and audience is a bit fuzzy. If the cartoonist feels that the project has run its course or that it's not reaching the intended goals, they can retire the project without much fuss. After all, everyone was getting it for free.

As more cartoonists use Patreon (http://patreon.com) or Tapastic's Support Program (http://goo.gl/bjXd6f) to subsidize their webcomic, the contract becomes a lot more explicit. Introducing support tiers and rewards creates an even more clear commitment to an audience. You're saying "This webcomic is now my part-time job, and (maybe) I hope to make it a full-time job."

But a traditional part-time job, even one you take on just to make some extra income, usually promises a well-defined amount of payment. With services like Patreon and Tapastic you're making the commitment to show up for the job, but there is no promise of any specific amount of pay.

So to whom are you committing? Are you committed to reaching a certain monetary goal first and foremost? Or are you committing to servicing an audience with the hope of reaching a goal? And if you fail to reach that goal, how do you navigate the friction of quitting when you've already made an explicit promise to that audience?

Join us for a Lean Into Art Cast with guest +Brandon Dayton.  Brandon has been navigating these concerns with his new Green Monk webcomic (http://ift.tt/1rFe4hv), and together we'll explore how things change when you make your webcomics intentions a lot more clear to the public.

You can comment during the live stream using the G+ event page.

#webcomics   #comics   #patreoncampaign   #crowdfunding  

Webcomics: To Whom are You Accountable? – LIA Cast 114

*When you make a webcomic, to whom are you accountable?*

Over the last decade there has been an implicit contract made between a webcomics author and their intended audience. “I update regularly, and in exchange you support me through encouragement, word-of-mouth advertising, and purchasing merchandise.” Because this contract is implicit, however, the commitment between author and audience is a bit fuzzy. If the cartoonist feels that the project has run its course or that it’s not reaching the intended goals, they can retire the project without much fuss. After all, everyone was getting it for free.

As more cartoonists use Patreon (http://patreon.com) or Tapastic’s Support Program (http://goo.gl/bjXd6f) to subsidize their webcomic, the contract becomes a lot more explicit. Introducing support tiers and rewards creates an even more clear commitment to an audience. You’re saying “This webcomic is now my part-time job, and (maybe) I hope to make it a full-time job.”

But a traditional part-time job, even one you take on just to make some extra income, usually promises a well-defined amount of payment. With services like Patreon and Tapastic you’re making the commitment to show up for the job, but there is no promise of any specific amount of pay.

So to whom are you committing? Are you committed to reaching a certain monetary goal first and foremost? Or are you committing to servicing an audience with the hope of reaching a goal? And if you fail to reach that goal, how do you navigate the friction of quitting when you’ve already made an explicit promise to that audience?

Join us for a Lean Into Art Cast with guest @101922731373162555484.  Brandon has been navigating these concerns with his new Green Monk webcomic (http://ift.tt/1rFe4hv), and together we’ll explore how things change when you make your webcomics intentions a lot more clear to the public.

You can comment during the live stream using the G+ event page.

#webcomics   #comics   #patreoncampaign   #crowdfunding  


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October 22, 2014 at 07:28AM

October 22, 2014 by  
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Gerimi draws and designs some lovely comics.

Gerimi Burleigh
originally shared:

MORNINGSTAR ISSUE 4 – Get it as a PDF eBook Now! (print comics arriving soon) http://ift.tt/10mM1sY #comics #western #lucifer #fallenangels
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October 21, 2014 at 09:10PM

October 21, 2014 by  
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Run, Boulder and Fleet!

We talked about Inktober at the top of this month's AADL Webcomics Lab (http://ift.tt/1w633Zw), and then all warmed up for the session with a 20-minute Inktober sketch.

It was fun to race the clock.

#inktober #boulderandfleet



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October 21, 2014 at 12:39AM

October 21, 2014 by  
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Make way for Lord Tractorman!

Lord Tractorman is Baron Von Bear's oldest and most trusted ally. Though cantankerous and gruff, he is always first to get between evil and its targets!

#inktober #boulderandfleet #inktober2014

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October 19, 2014 at 11:09PM

October 19, 2014 by  
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Baron von Bear releases his helper wisps!

Baron von Bear swings his Staff of Wisps, releasing his etherial friends who each represent one aspect of magic. Together they can stop any adversary!

(Is it against the rules to use color in Inktober sketches?)

#inktober #inktober2014 #boulderandfleet 

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October 19, 2014 at 12:14PM

October 19, 2014 by  
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Early Boulder and Fleet style test

For a time I was exploring drawing the Boulder and Fleet comic in LayerPaint HD on the Galaxy Note 10.1. I got close to mimicking a dry brush effect, but I wasn't 100% satisfied with the results.

The new comic is being drawn in Clip Studio Paint, though I'm continuing to pencil the pages in LayerPaint HD.

#boulderandfleet #comics #webcomics

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